Gluten And Corn Free Alcohol

A Corn free Alcohol is difficult to find contrary to Gluten free Alcohols. With the Gluten Free bandwagon becoming so popular and commonplace, manufacturers are promoting which of their products meet the gluten free standards (click here if you are interested in only gluten free alcohols). So finding those products are made easier in the hopes that they will sell faster. Corn free diets hasn’t reach such prominence yet and it’s a bit more legwork to find products that are corn free.

Photo from www.freedigitalphotos.net

When you see Corn and Gluten Free written on a label or elsewhere, always double check that the manufacturer means that their product has neither of these two, versus one or the other. The phrasing can go either way and has caught more than a person off guard.

Here’s an Gluten and Corn Free Alcohol origin cheat sheet to help you determine what your best options are:

  • Rum is made exclusively from sugar cane.
  • Tequila is made from agave, according to Mexican laws, however, just use the pure Tequila and not the Tequila with added flavors.
  • Some Wines are both gluten and corn free, depending on the winery.
  • Brandy (fruit and grapes brandy) can be gluten free and corn free -but not all are corn and gluten free
  • Grappa is made from grapes.
  • Slivovitz (Fruit Brandy) is made from plums.



Beer

Which beer is gluten and corn free? That’s a tricky question. Of course, with the increase of the gluten free awareness there is an emerging market of specifically designed gluten free beers. These manufacturers use non-gluten ingredients or filter out the gluten using enzymes.

The vast majority of beers on the American market contain corn. Thanks to the Bavarian Purity Act in Germany, those German beers are corn free, but they use other things such as barley to make their beer. Barley contains gluten. Don’t throw away your beer steins yet. There are beers out there that are stated as being tolerable for the both corn and gluten community. Heineken and Amstel Light are reported to have such low levels of gluten that many with allergies can enjoy them without reactions and they are not problems for corn allergy sufferer.



Wine

Every person has a different level of allergy sensitivity, but Gallo Sauvignon Blanc is a popular choice in the gluten free community and those with corn allergies have reported that this wine doesn’t cause reactions.

Another option to consider is drinking organic wines. These wines, too, are not inclined to post their ingredients on their labels. I’ve sent emails to several companies who specialize in making organic wine. I will post their replies as they come in.

Here are som Vodkas which are definetly corn and gluten free:

Vodka



  • Potato Vodka (Chopin – from poland) (Use to make vanilla for baking)

Where to buy: Online: http://www.chopinvodka.com/main.htm



  • Grapes Vodka (Ciroc)

Sold by Ciroc

(Chopin – from poland) (Use to make vanilla for baking)

Where to buy:

Stores: In most supermarkets

Online: http://www.ciroc.com/abouts/view/1

Many gluten free alcohols contain corn. (If corn isn’t your concern, click here to view my article specifically about Gluten Free alcohols.) It’s more difficult to find corn free alcohol than gluten free alcohol because corn is popular. Corn is popular with the public because it’s a cultural staple and it’s popular with manufacturers because it’s inexpensive to obtain.

Corn is very difficult to detect in alcohol because it’s not as poignant a flavor as, say, tabasco. If there was tabasco in your beer, you’d know about it after the first sip. Not so with corn. So how can we find out if there’s corn in our cup?

Many countries, including the United States, do not require a manufacturer to list the ingredients of their alcoholic beverages. This is problematic for the allergy community but also curious for the general public. What exactly are they filling their bottles with, hmmm?

It’s general knowledge that alcohol is not made from corn; so it should be easy to find a corn free alcohol, however, corn products are used to boost the alcohol content during the fermentation process and/or to sweeten the finished product. So, they are not used in the beginning, but are thrown in like that dash of salt at the end.





Replies from Wineries

From Stellar Winery

“Hello Martina, Thank you for your query. We do not use any additives or additions that contain corn or gluten. Being Organic we try and minimize any additives as far as possible. I hope this helps and please do not hesitate if you have any other questions.

Best regards Stellar winery”



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